Biography

Even if the word surely wasn’t invented for a Baroque artist: his performance had verve!
— Jonas Rohde, Göttinger Tabenblatt

Nathaniel Mander is one of the most exciting young harpsichordists to emerge on the scene in recent years. He graduated first class from the Royal Academy of Music and has since gone on to pursue an international career.

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He began his education with Richard Lester before moving to London to study with Carole Cerasi at the Royal Academy of Music where he graduated with first class honours.

In 2010 Nathaniel won first prize at the Early Keyboard Ensemble Competition at Fenton House. The following year he returned and won first prize at the 10th Broadwood Harpsichord Competition, later winning 2nd place at the Gianni Gambi Harpsichord competition in Pesaro (Italy), the Accompanist's Prize for the John Kerr Award at Finchcocks and the Harold Samuel Bach Solo Keyboard Prize at the Royal Academy of Music. In 2014 Nathaniel held the Linda Hill Junior Fellowship in Harpsichord at the Royal College of Music for two consecutive years.

Nathaniel is in demand for solo, chamber and orchestra appearances throughout Europe and in the United States. He has performed for radio and television and at all the major UK halls, including the Wigmore Hall, King’s Place, the Purcell Room, St. Martin-in-the-Fields, St.John's Smith Square, and the Royal Festival Hall.

Real virtuosity... can be a given nowadays, but what can differentiate performers is their ability to go beyond that and to reveal their own, and the composer’s, musicality... Nathaniel Mander is about as far from the irritating ‘look-at-me’ antics of some performers as you can get...
— Andrew Benson-Wilson, London Festival of Baroque Music

Nathaniel's debut CD, The 18th century French salon, was highly praised by the critics at its release in 2015, and in collaboration with award winning film director David Percy, he has recorded a series of music videos.

Nathaniel’s imaginative realisation... was a joy throughout... the palette of colours was extraordinary.
— Hexam Courant